RPM History

The brand RPM

On Behind The Brand, we bring to you the stories behind our labels at Hydro Surf. If a brand isn't doesn't have a story worth tell, they're not worth selling. We thought why not start things off with our longest reigning favourite, New Zealand's very own RPM.

since 1994

Founded in 1994, RPM originated as a Snow Outerwear brand, but their roots in surfing and skating soon saw them grow broader into the market and become the iconic company we know today. Still based in Mount Maunganui, and still driven by a small collective of good nature'd creative humans! We've been stocking RPM since the begging, and have never looked back - until now... let's take a peek!


gone surfing

new zealand's premier surfwear label earns it's salt

It's hard to imagine living in Mount Maunganui if you're a surfer, because there's probably no more sheltered stretch of coast for swell in the whole of NZ, than the big B.O.P. Yet still there's such a strong history of surfing that belongs to the Mount that one cannot really right the place off. In fact, many of the country's best surfers have been raised on these sandy, sunny, north facing beaches, and if you make the effort to stay there a while you will soon find it's well worth the wait when the waves do come, and it's central location between many of the best surfing spots in the North Island continues to see it grow more popular still. RPM's always been behind surfing, and though it doesn't publish itself heavily in that way, you needn't think back long, or flick far through a magazine until you find their strong presence.

The RPM Surf Team, on an NZ Tour. 2008. Photos L-R: The RPM Collection - via Silas Hansen

Kaikoura / Dunedin Surfer, Nat Parsons blowing the top off a wave at St Kilda.

Natty P featured in a lot of exciting RPM surf imagery over the years. Here he is going sky high!

Unlike most sales representatives these days, RPM's Mike Wheeler actually surfs - really good !

Wheeler, sneaking a quick one in on his lunch break.


Oh, and the snow.

RPM also produce some of the best snow outerwear that's available any wear!!

RPM rider Nick Brown getting deep in Japan. 2016 Photo @woodygphoto 

Nick Brown, Nick Hyne and Stef Zeestraten going back country at Mt Cook. 2015.

RPM brand manager Ben Parry loves the white stuff, and plays a big part in the Outerwear Program. 2015


Behind the SCENE'S.

RPM's original, Mike Smith, busting out from behind the scenes for this classic old denim advertisement.

Mike and Emmit outside the RPM headquarters. 2004.

Mike at the NZ Snow Industries annual Trade Show. 2005.

LOCAL

New Zealand brand, based in Mt Maunganui.

QUALITY

Consistently committed to making the best quality clothing possible.



New from RPM

The 2016 Spring / Summer Range has just hit the shelves, click above to check it out.

Shop Women

Click the image above to check out the new range.

Shop Men

Click the image above to check out the new range.



Thank you.

For reading our little story on RPM.


Construction happening at St Clair

Construction at St Clair

It's been a long time, but, there's finally something happening in the vacant lot next door. The surprise for many is that the vacant lot is not where the construction will be, rather that's the base site for operations on the building behind the vacant lot - the last little cottage, which is in between The Hydro, and Spirit House. See below for more info.

Construction here will be taking place over the next 12 months. The changes you will see to the footpath and parking between The Hydro Building and Starfish are just going to be a temporary closures during week days over this year period. Un-fortunately it's not the prettiest thing to look at, but it is at least interesting to watch, I'd recommend stopping by for a gander! 

It's this immediate period of major earth works which will be taking place over the next few months that will likely cause the most disruptions for us 'the public'. We urge you all to keep on life as usual, and tackle the Esplanade as you normally chose. A couple of parks will be missing, but there's plenty more around, and there will be noise sometimes but the weekends will be quiet as usual, and the restaurants, cafes and our shop will be trading as usual. Large construction machinery and trucks will be coming and going from the site, and there may be some times where they slow the traffic on The Esplanade strip, but there will be traffic officials helping manage these times. If you desperately need to hurtle your road rage and abuse, they'll all be well marked in Fluro uniforms and hard hats.

We will be documenting the changes and putting up regular posts with updates and how-to tips to handle the construction site on our Facebook, and this Hydro Surf Blog. Stay tuned.

Hydro Surf

Saint Clair's Southern Right Whales


Tohora , Eubalaena australis


Some of you may know that Southern Right whales (or Tohora, in our native tongue) are seen occasionally from the mainland coast of New Zealand, but you have to be pretty lucky to spot any and if you've seen some yourself, or heard of it in the past, they're mostly just fleeting moments. This week has been a buzz at St Clair with a pair that have not only visited, but seem to be hanging around to enjoy the mild winter weather. A native migrant to New Zealand, Tohora range mainly between 20°S and 55°S and travel into calmer coastal waters during end of Winter and early Spring for mating (romance). The uncharacteristically small surf conditions we've had for this season are potentially part of the reason they're in so close right now, and as their visits here have been on days with flat water and calm winds, we hope to see them back tomorrow when the swell drops off again! We will be posting alerts on Facebook and Instagram if we see any sign of activity so you don't miss this very special thing. The only places where New Zealand's right whales can be found consistently and in reasonable numbers are at the Auckland Islands and Campbell Island. 

HISTORY:

The stories of old with Whales being hunted here in Otago send chills down the spine, and it seems hard to fathom either the whalers practice, or the whales themselves being 'viable' creatures to hunt. Strangely though this was a key component of The Early European Settlement here, as these whales were highly prized by whalers for their oil (used for heating and lighting) and whalebone (or baleen), which was made into corsets and parasols. The industry grew particularly strong in Otago between 1830-1850 until the whales were hunted to the brink of extinction, with estimates around 70 and as low as 30 individuals being left. The name 'Right Whale' echos eerily the ideas of the time, with these lovely creatures being the 'right' whale to hunt as they're slow-paced swimmers (travelling no more than 9 kilometres per hour), they were easy to catch; they supplied larger quantities of oil than other species; when harpooned they floated rather than sank.

Protection for these whales in New Zealand Waters has been in place since 1937, and good news for everyone is that these coastal sightings appear to be becoming more common. The New Zealand population is thought to be now increasing at about 5% per year! Long may they return! 

Whale Footage and DOC interview

Tohora

Eubalaena australis

For more information on our friendly Southern Right Whales, click the link below.

Hydro Surf Shop

Thanks to these websites for their information:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_right_whale

http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/whales/page-3

http://www.doc.govt.nz/nature/native-animals/marine-mammals/whales/southern-right-whales-tohora/

http://whaledolphintrust.org.nz/projects/southern-right-whales/


Swimears


SwimEars just released in New Zealand!


New Zealand SwimEars Ambassador

"We are stoked to be using SwimEars. Why? Most earplugs have a ‘one size fits all’ mentality. SwimEars enable you to custom fit the plug to your ears – how cool is that? If you are like us one of the frustrating things about wearing an earplug is you are then cut off from your swim mates – you can no longer hear them. Well SwimEars are also designed to let sound in! The third ‘win’ for us is that the plugs are connected via a leash. We were a little sceptical to begin however the leash fits nicely under the cap and that one time in hundred your custom fitted plug falls out (maybe when swimming with dolphins) you don’t lose it!" - Dan Abel

Dan is the owner and head coach for open water swim specialist swim company www.fitandabel.com. He is also a pioneer in New Zealand of open water sportive swimming under the brand RealSwim Adventures


Global SwimEars Ambassador

“This is truly a revolutionary product. Keeping the ear canal open and dry while swimming has changed my feel for the water, the added bonus of being able to hear clearly while submerged will help triathletes relax and be more aware while in open water.” - Dave Scott

Dave is the most recognized athlete and coach in the sport of triathlon. He is a six-time Ironman World Champion and the first inductee into the Ironman Hall of Fame


All you need to know about SwimEars


FCS II - 11 Events / 11 Wins

2015 was a huge year of victories for FCS II on the WSL World Championship Tour. In fact, every single event on the Men’s WCT tour was won by a surfer riding the FCS II system and fins. From the first event at Snapper Rocks where Filipe came firing out of the gates, through to Adriano’s victory at Pipe to claim his maiden World Title, the FCS II system and fins were an integral part of the surfer’s success. Carissa Moore also claimed her third WSL World Title riding the FCS II system, and FCS global team rider Gabriel Medina showed his Hawaiian prowess by winning the prestigious Triple Crown Series. To date, no other fin system can claim a single World Title, so as the statistics continue to rise, FCS is proud to celebrate wins.FCS II… The New World Standard Fin System

Which Fin Won? 

Quiksilver Pro, Snapper Rocks (Winner: Filipe Toledo – FCS II Performer PCC Medium)

Rip Curl Pro, Bells Beach (Winner: Mick Fanning – FCS II MF PC Large)

Drug Aware Pro, Margaret River (Winner: Adriano De Souza – FCS II Carver PCC Medium)

Oi Rio Pro, (Winner: Filipe Toledo – FCS II MF PC Medium)

Fiji Pro, Cloudbreak Fiji (Winner: Owen Wright – FCS II MF PC Large)

J-Bay Pro,  (Winners: Mick Fanning/Julian Wilson – FCS II MF PC Large)

Billabong Pro, Teahupoo Tahiti (Winner: Jeremy Flores – FCS II MF PC Medium)

Hurley Pro, Trestles (Winner: Mick Fanning – FCS II MF PC Large)

Quiksilver Pro, France (Winner: Gabriel Medina – FCS II GM PCC Large)

Moche Rip Curl Pro, Portugal (Winner: Filipe Toledo – FCS II Performer PCC Medium)

Billabong Pro, Pipeline (Winner: Adriano De Souza – FCS II Carver PCC Medium)

Kehu Butler - First Red Bull New Zealand Surf Athelete

KEHU BUTLER BREAKS AS THE FIRST RED BULL NEW ZEALAND SURF ATHLETE.

 

Young Arataki born Kehu Butler has been closely watched since 2012, and this week has finally rode his wave into the Red Bull family, as the company’s first ever New Zealand surf athlete.

The 15-year-old has unquestionable talent and style, and enjoyed an afternoon earlier this week checking out the Warriors training at Mt Smart Stadium. After a tour of the club, Kehu was surprised by Red Bull expedition kayak athlete Ben Brown, who handed over Kehu’s new branded cap. Kehu was also welcomed by Warriors star Shaun Johnson in front of the whole NRL team, gifting Kehu his freshly Red Bull decaled board. It was a special moment for the teenager.


“That was probably one of the best days of my life,” says Kehu. “I’m a huge league fan and Shaun Johnson is one of my heroes. I got to play a quick game of one-on-one touch with him and I stepped him [laughs]. I’m a big Warriors fan so it was a sweet bonus.”

Surfing is in Kehu Butler’s blood. His grand-uncle Paul Bennett won a national title in the 1970s and was the first Maori surfer to compete overseas. His father Khan and uncle Matt both represented New Zealand and when Khan helped his young son onto a surfboard for the first time at the age of six, he knew his boy had inherited the surfing genes.

 

“I pushed him into the whitewash in the waves of Arataki, the small community in Mount Maunganui where we’re from, and he stood up straight away,” says Khan. “He hasn't looked back since.”

“We’d watch guys like Tom Curren, Kelly Slater and Andy Irons and I’d try to mimic their cutbacks, turns and style,” says Kehu. “Dad wanted me to have the basics down pat before I started to get into anything freakish!”

When he wasn’t surfing, Kehu and his cousin would go to the local skate park to work on his turns and transitions.

“We worked really hard to get his foundations right before moving onto the bigger stuff, like airs and tricks,” says Khan. “He’s having fun with that now, and breaking a lot of boards! We watched the old guys that surf the wave like they’re dancing, so we worked on his flow and nailing good rail manoeuvres. He has a real clean, smooth style. That’s his trump card.”

Kehu started winning local comps at a young age, but his first major win was in Piha at the Rip Curl Grom Search in 2010. Just nine-years-old at the time, Kehu won the U12s and finished fourth in the U14s.

“That was pretty sweet,” says Kehu. “I remember walking up the beach to Dad with a huge smile on my face. I started getting a few sponsors after that [Quicksilver, i.am global, Skull Candy, FCS, Gorilla Grip, Electric, Smoothstar] and started thinking about surfing as a career.”


The following year at a competition in Australia, Gary Cruickshank the head coach of the Australian High Performance Squad paid him the ultimate compliment.

“He told Kehu that he reminded him of Kelly Slater on the water,” says Khan. “Kelly Slater is one of his favourite surfers so that was huge.”


In 2012 Kehu won the U12 final in the Skullcandy Oz Grom Open in Lennox Heads. Two years later he was back to claim the U14 crown. That same year he won the New Zealand national U14 title and finished second in the U16 category. He also made his mark on the world stage, finishing 7th in the U16 ISA World Grommet Championship at Salinas Beach in Ecuador.

Kehu had another stellar year in 2015 winning the U16 and U18 national titles, finishing 3rd in the Rip Curl International GromSearch in Brazil and topping it off with a win in Occy’s Grom competition in Coolangatta, Queensland. The Occy Grom competition is one of the most prestigious junior surfing competitions in Australia and it confirmed Kehu’s potential as one of the best young surfers in the world.

 

“He’d been trying to win it for a few years and he absolutely smashed it in the final,” says Khan. “He pulled this huge big air reverse and he usually doesn't do moves like that in competition. He usually relies on his smooth style. His family were all there to support him and we carried him up the beach on our shoulders after the final and did a haka for him. That was pretty special.”

Kehu turns 16 at the end of March and his big goal this year is to win the U16 ISA World Junior Championship in Portugal in September. After that, the sky’s the limit.

 

“Long term I want to make the WCT but my ultimate goal is to be world champ one day,” he says. “I just want to go hard and give it my best every time I get on the water.”

 

Read Kehu Butler’s full profile on www.redbull.co.nz/kehubutler

How to check for Melanoma

Aloe Up Ultra Pro Sport Sunscreen

Available in SPF 15, 30 and 50.Aloe Up Pro Ultra Sport formula was designed for the extreme athlete in mind. With a 35% by volume pure Aloe Vera Gel base, Aloe Up provides natural moisturizing while protecting from UVA and UVB rays.

Aloe Up sunscreens leave no greasy residue and are Water Resistant (80 minutes) enabling you to compete outdoors knowing Aloe Up won’t run in your eyes while protecting you from the suns’ damaging rays. The unique combination of these 5 active sunscreens in an aloe base provide full Broad Spectrum Protection. Aloe Up Pro Ultra Sport does not contain undesirable ingredients such as Oxybenzone, Parabens, Mineral Oil and Alcohol.

SHOP HERE

SurfEars 2.0

SurfEars 2.0 

Large numbers of surfers, swimmers and water sports enthusiasts suffer from ear problems associated with excessive exposure to the elements. Ear infections and the dreaded "surfers ear” is a condition on the rise with increasing numbers seeking medical attention and ear surgery. SurfEars 2.0® is a revolutionary new product developed by a team of professional product designers and dedicated surfers from Sweden. SurfEars recognised that the critical difference between SurfEars and other earplug products is they not only protect ears from water, cold air, and contaminants but also maximize sound and subsequent balance essential for most water and board sports. Many of the earplugs on the market today block out sound, therefore large numbers of surfers choose to go without plugs. SurfEars was designed to keep the water out but also let the sound in, to enable users to stay connected to the environment.




How It Works

SurfEars are designed with an acoustic mesh that can be found in high end audio applications, blocking out water and protecting the ear while allowing the maximum amount of sound to enter the ear canal. The mesh is connected to a plastic core designed to replicate the natural resonance frequency of the ear and boosting acoustic performance. Independent tests show that SurfEars have close to zero acoustic loss in the frequency range of human speech. We’ve redesigned SurfEars 2.0 so you’ll be able to hear even be tter. Inverting the fixation between gel and core, we’ve managed to increase the area of the sound channel by 72%, while the triangular shape of the opening has increased surface area by 32%.


Other notable improvements are:
  
• Improved hearing due to increased volume of sound canal 
• Improved hydrophobic coating (HY+), stays unclogged longer 
• Leash option with length adjuster & wetsuit clip 
• New improved ear buds with improved fit water seal.  Improved fit for those with advanced Surfers Ear development

2016 Billabong National Surfing Championship

Viewing platform from St. Clair. - Image courtesy of Mark Stevenson

Billy Stairmand 2016 National Champion - Image courtesy of Mark Stevenson

An unstoppable Billy Stairmand (Raglan) has today (Saturday 16th January) claimed his third straight national title at the 2016 Billabong National Surfing Championships presented by Health 2000, held at St Clair Beach, Dunedin.  

By claiming the title, Stairmand has equalled the New Zealand record of five titles that is held by Auckland surfers Wayne Parkes and Iain Buchanan.  1987 was the last time a hat-trick of victories has been achieved (Iain Buchanan). Contrastingly, Stairmand was joined by Ella Williams (WGM) who surfed to her first title in the Open Women’s Division.

Host club South Coast Boardriders Association claimed the club championship over defending champions Bay Boardriders of Mount Maunganui and Christchurch club North Wai Boardriders who placed third.The day got off to a slow start as competitors waited for the building swell.  

By 10:30am conditions were contestable and the swell increased to 2.0m by the time the premier finals of the event were held late in the afternoon. A variable onshore breeze persisted throughout the day. Stairmand’s ability to lift in the big finals of the National Championships is well known and today was no different.  He found himself trailing his good friend and board shaper Luke Hughes early in the 30 minute final.  Hughes’ lead, which included scores of 8.4 and 8.0 out of a possible ten points, was no issue for Stairmand as he built his scores first with an 8.77 then a 9.13 and a 9.03 to take the lead leaving his closest opponent, Hughes, needing a near perfect 9.58 point ride for victory.  

“Starting the year off with a win is always good and to have my name on that trophy with all those amazing surfers like Al Byrne, Wayne Parkes, Iain Buchanan, Maz and Jay Quinn is crazy, I am stoked to win any day but Nationals is always amazing” exclaimed Stairmand.

“Hughesy kept me on my feet at the start, he is my shaper and I couldn’t let him win but he started off with two eight point rides and I knew I had to step it up.  The waves just kept on pumping and pumping and I am just so stoked the waves were good for our final and let me have the opportunity to show my best surfing and eventually win” he added.Stairmand is heading to Hawaii in the next two weeks to start his international campaign at the Volcom Pipe Masters so to win here this week is a good confidence boost.  “I am nervous going over for that event but I have surfed some good waves down here outside of the competition and I am aiming for a good result” said Stairmand who hopes to meet up with New Zealand’s top ranked surfer Ricardo Christie during the first event of the year.Stairmand finished today’s final with an 18.17 point heat total, Hughes unable to further his 16.40 point heat start but still finishing runner up and producing his career best result.The race between Stairmand and Maz Quinn (Gis) for five titles was unfortunately lost by Maz who finished third.  

Quinn battled with Stairmand from the quarterfinals this week, beating him once but placing second to Stairmand in the semifinals and losing again in the final.  Quinn could not find the right waves in the todays match up and with pressure mounting started to go for broke to bridge the gap but ended up falling on crucial waves.

Placing fourth in the final was local hero JC Susan who also went missing in the final after a stellar run throughout the week.  Susan, the only goofy foot surfer in the final, finished with a heat total of 8.17 points.Stairmand with five titles and three straight is a complete contrast to Open Women’s Division winner Ella Williams (WGM) who claimed her first title today.

Ella Williams.  Image courtesy of Mark Stevenson

Despite a lack of wins at New Zealand’s most prestigious event, Williams accolades made her a favourite for the event and she delivered with a win courtesy of a 13.5 point heat total.  Like Stairmand, Williams has her sights set on international ambitions this year but for this week it has all about been achieving a childhood goal. 

“I have dreamed of getting that title since I was seven years old” said Williams.  Ever since I have been going in comps, I have wanted to get my hands on this trophy.  It has always been a tough challenge with the good surfers coming through, so to finally get it caps off a great week” she added.

Up against three younger competitors, Williams knew she had to find the right waves and when she took a left early in the final and got stuck on the inside, she knew she was up against it.“It was pumping today, it was good to have such good waves for a comp, we all got a good opportunity and luckily it was a 30 minute final for me and that gave me time to secure the win but congrats to the girls they were all surfing well.”Williams now turns her attention to qualifying for the World Tour and after sitting in 29th at the end of 2015, her focus is now on the first event of the year to be staged at Burleigh Heads in Australia at the start of February where she aims to push toward a top six ranking.

Placing second in the Women’s Final was Kea Smith (Mnt).  Smith contested three finals today placing runner up in each, an amazing effort for the fifteen year old surfer.  Smith ended with an 11.1 point heat total to beat fellow triple finalist Elin Tawharu (Mnt) who finished in third and Bianca Sansom (Auck) who finished in fourth. 

Elliot Brown.  Image courtesy of Mark Stevenson

Dunedin’s Elliot Brown claimed the third title for local surfers winning the Under 18 Boys Division.  Brown bested his three opponents in a close battle that had 2.5 points separating all four competitors.“I am so happy to take out the Under 18s in Dunedin, it means so much to me” explained a humble Brown.  “I didn’t make the 16s final so to make this final and win, it is even better, I am super happy to take that out.  

Brown said that it was stressful after surfing to a first good score of a 7.70.  He knew he only needed a small score to move in to first but that score didn’t come until the last minute of the final when he snatched the victory.  “It has been cool to have the comp down here with all the home support and seeing all the top surfers in New Zealand surfing my home break” added Brown whilst reflecting on the week.

Brown defeated Sam Sands (Chch) who finished runner up, Jonas Tawharu (Mnt) in third and Caleb Cutmore (Ham) in fourth.Australian based Kaya Horne took out the Under 16 Boys Division adding the title to his Under 14 Boys win in 2015.  Horne was too good for his opponents with young Dunedin surfer Jack McLeod finishing runner up ahead of Jared Gebert (Ohope) in third and Joel Clegg (Tara) in fourth.

Elin Tawharu.  Image courtesy of Mark Stevenson

Triple finalist Elin Tawahru (Mnt) may have tired in the Open Women’s Final but after claiming two titles in the age group divisions, perhaps it was to be expected.  Tawharu, along with Kea Smith had a massive day of surfing and she managed to cross the first two hurdles with victories.  

First was the Under 16 Girls Division where she defeated Smith in the final along with Zhana Hutchieson (Tara) in third and Tiana-Breeze De Mooij (Mnt) in fourth.  Next up was the Under 18 Girls Division where Smith again placed runner up with Raiha Ensor (Mnt) in third and Billie Scott (Whangarei) in fourth.Dunedin local Felix Dickson took another title for the Dunedin surfer winning the Over 28 Men’s Division.  

Dickson started with an excellent nine point ride before finishing with a 15.6 point heat total.  Dickson defeated Daniel Kereopa (Rag) who finished second, Josh Thickpenny (Dun) in third and Luke Hughes (Rag) in fourth.Daniel Kereopa claimed four runner-up finishes contesting the most heats of any surfer on the final day and throughout the week.  

Kereopa also finished runner up in the Longboard Division to Zen Wallis (Piha), Stand Up Paddleboard to three time champion Shayne Baxter (Chch) and Over 35 Men’s Division to Jarred Hancox (Tara).Additional title wins in the senior divisions went to Mike Christensen (Chch) in the Over 40 Men’s Division, Morgan Cronin (Auck) in the Over 45 Men’s Division, Neill Robb (Chch) in the Over 50 Men’s Division and Ken Nicholson (Auck) in the Over 55 Men’s Division.  

Alexis Poulter (Waihi Beach) claimed her second title of the event in the Women’s Longboard after winning the Women’s Stand Up Paddleboard earlier in the week.  Sam Sands (Chch) won the Junior Men’s Longboard Division.The youngest competitors in the event got their chance early in the proceedings and Thomas Robinson (Whangarei) capped off a stellar week by taking home his first ever title.  Robinson posted a 12.91 point heat total that included a 6.67 point ride on his last wave.  

Robinson defeated Maddy Barclay (Oamaru) who finished in second ahead of Ruben Peyroux (Dun) in third and Taylor O’Leary (Mur) in fourth. Local surfer Tash Civil claimed the Senior Women’s Division over Sarah Armstrong – Park (Chch) in second, Lucy Te Moananui (Kaik) in third and Margurite Vujcich (HBay) in fourth. Words - Surfing NZ


Please see below for final results from the 2016 Billabong National Surfing Championships presented by Health 2000 completed at St Clair Beach, Dunedin today (Saturday 16th January).

Open Men’s Division Final Billy Stairmand (Rag), 18.17, 1, Luke Hughes (Rag), 16.40, 2, Maz Quinn (Gis), 13.57, 3, JC Susan (Dun), 8.17, 4

Under 18 Boys Division Final Elliot Brown (Dun), 12.5, 1, Sam Sands (Chch), 11.1, 2, Jonas Tawharu (Mnt), 10.3, 3, Caleb Cutmore (Ham), 10.2, 4

Under 16 Boys Division Final Kaya Horne (Mnt), 13.37, 1, Jack McLeod (Dun), 10.6, 2, Jared Gebert (Ohope), 9.73, 3, Joel Clegg (Tara), 9.17, 4

Under 14 Boys Division Final Tom Robinson (Whngrei), 12.9, 1, Maddy Barclay (Oam), 10.1, 2, Ruben Peyroux (Dun), 7.9, 3, Taylor O'Leary (Mur), 5.17, 4

Open Women’s Division Final Ella Williams (Whmata), 13.5, 1, Kea Smith (Mnt), 11.1, 2, Elin Tawahru (Mnt), 8.2, 3, Bianca Sansom (Auck), 7.37, 4

Over 30 Women’s Division Final Tash Civil (Dun), 8.33, 1, Sarah Armstrong-Park (Chch), 5.23, 2, Lucy Te Moananui (Kaik), 4.57, 3, Margurite Vujcich (Hbay), 0, 4

Under 18 Girls Division Final Elin Tawharu (Mnt), 12.7, 1, Kea Smith (Mnt), 9.27, 2, Raiha Ensor (Mnt), 7.03, 3, Billie Scott (Whangarei), 5.1, 4

Under 16 Girls Division Final Elin Tawharu (Mnt), 14.8, 1, Kea Smith (Arataki), 12.1, 2, Zhana Hutchison (Tara), 6.23, 3, Tiana - Breeze de Mooj (Mnt), 4.97, 4

Over 28 Men’s Division Final Felix Dickson (Dun), 15.6, 1, Daniel Kereopa (Rag), 14.9, 2, Josh Thickpenny (Dun), 14.8, 3, Luke Hughes (Rag), 11.8, 4

Over 35 Men’s Division Final Jarred Hancox (Tara), 13, 1, Daniel Kereopa (Rag), 12.4, 2, Nick Black (Chch), 12.3, 3, Craig Higgins (Dun), 6.3, 4

Over 40 Men’s Division Final Mike Christensen (Chch), 12, 1, Ben Kennings (WGM), 9.27, 2, Justin Summerton (Chch), 7.23, 3, Lyndon Fairburn (Dun), 5.8, 4

Over 45 Men’s Division Final Morgan Cronin (Auck), 13.8, 1, Andrew Christensen (Chch), 11.7, 2, Richard Baxter (Kaik), 11.5, 3, Patrick Bonner (Chch), 7.1, 4

Over 50 Men’s Division Final Neill Robb (Chch), 9.07, 1, Phillip Griffin (Mnt), 8.33, 2, John Rousey (Chch), 7.63, 3, Mark Stevenson (Dun), 6.43, 4

Over 55 Men’s Division Final Ken Nicholson (Auck), 8.23, 1, Peter De Mooij (Mnt), 6.07, 2, Michael Gray (Auck), 5.13, 3, Kevin Shaw (ChCh), 1.5, 4

Over 60 Men’s Division Final Michael Gray (Auck), 8.43, 1, Clive Barron (Piha), 3.9, 2, Ken Nicholson (Auck), 1.07, 3

Men’s Longboard Division Zen Wallis (Piha), 14.9, 1, Daniel Kereopa (Rag), 13.4, 2, Jordan Griffin (Mnt), 11.7, 3, Nick Black (Chch), 10.2, 4Under 18 Bys Longboard DivisionSam Sands (Chch), 7.9, 1, Henry Hawke (Chch), 7.6, 2, Neko Tohiariki (Chch), 5.7, 3, Cairo Griffin (Dun), 3.93, 4

Women’s Longboard Division Alexis Poulter (Waihi Beach), 11.27, 1, Estella Hungerford (Chch), 7.43, 2, Renee Davenport (Rag), 6.53, 3, Margurite Vujcich (Hbay), 5.57, 4

Men’s Stand Up Paddleboard Division Shayne Baxter (Chch), 14.2, 1, Daniel Kereopa (Rag), 11.5, 2, Shane Murrell (Auck), 8.53, 3, Shaan Miller (Auck), 3.43, 4

Women’s Stand Up Paddleboard Division Alexis Poulter (Waihi Beach), 7.27, 1, Renee Davenport (Rag), 5.9, 2, Lucy Te Moananui (Kaik), 1, 3, Annabel Anderson (Qtown), N/S, n/s

Kneeboard Division Kelvin Weir (Tara), 13.17, 1, Malcolm Diack (Dun), 9.93, 2, Greg Bell (Dun), 6.63, 3, Murray Weir (Tara), 5.9, 4

Felix Dickson. Image courtesy of Mark Stevenson

SurfEars 2.0

• IMPROVED ACOUSTICS • We’ve redesigned SurfEars™ 2.0 to allow greater sound penetration so you will hear even better

• ADDITION OF LEASH • SurfEars™ 2.0 comes with an adjustable leash for added security

• BETTER FIT • Studying the anatomy of the outer ear we’ve managed to increase the number of contact points, ensuring even better fixation

• HYDROPHOBIC COATING • New HY+ coating increases water repellency for better performance

• RE-DESIGNED SEALING GEL •  SurfEars 2.0 features a redesigned sealing gel which improves water seal, fit and comfort. Shorter intrusion depth to accommodate for people with severe surfer’s ear and is adjustable to fit all ear sizes


SurfEars™ 2.0

We are pleased to announce the release of the new and advanced ear plug system SurfEars 2.0.The release of SurfEars 2.0 coincides with the recent signing of 2 x World Champion Tom Carroll as its Global Ambassador.Large numbers of surfers, swimmers and water sports enthusiasts suffer from ear problems associated with excessive exposure to the elements. 

Ear infections and the dreaded “surfers ear” is a condition on the rise with increasing numbers seeking medical attention and ear surgery.SurfEars 2.0® is a revolutionary new product developed by a team of professional product designers and dedicated surfers from Sweden. SurfEars recognised that the critical difference between SurfEars and other earplug products is they not only protect ears from water, cold air, and contaminants but also maximize sound and subsequent balance essential for most water and board sports. 


How It Works

SurfEars are designed with an acoustic mesh that can be found in high end audio applications, blocking out water and protecting the ear while allowing the maximum amount of sound to enter the ear canal. The mesh is connected to a plastic core designed to replicate the natural resonance frequency of the ear and boosting acoustic performance. Independent tests show that SurfEars have close to zero acoustic loss in the frequency range of human speech.We’ve redesigned SurfEars 2.0 so you’ll be able to hear even better. Inverting the fixation between gel and core, we’ve managed to increase the area of the sound channel by 72%, while the triangular shape of the opening has increased surface area by 32%. The result is noticeably improved hearing.

Other notable improvements are:

• SurfEars 2.0 comes with an optional leash, adjustable to fit snugly around your neck. No more lost plugs, period.

• Studying the anatomy of the outer ear we’ve managed to increase the number of contact points, ensuring even better fixation.

• We have also introduced a new and improved hydrophobic coating, HY+, and we’ve been able to increase water repellency even further, ensuring that your plugs stay unclogged longer.

• SurfEars 2.0 features a redesigned sealing gel which improves water seal, fit and comfort. Shorter intrusion depth to accommodate for people with severe surfer’s ear

“Finally, after a long & painful period of avoidance, my left ear was surgically cleared of exostosis (surfers ear) two years ago and my right ear almost 99% blocked and now booked in for surgery. “SurfEars” couldn’t have come at a better time in my life. My doctor took one look at the product and his face lit up with joy…finally something he can issue to his never ending surgical roster of surfing patients…which is specifically designed to give us the ability to hear and engage with others while protecting ourselves from this extraordinary, natural response from our bodies to protect itself, again THANK YOU!! Tom Carroll Global Ambassador SurfEars.